Salads

Root Veg Salad with Kale

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6 beets, medium sized
3 parsnips, large, chopped
3 carrots, large, chopped
1 bunch of kale, finely sliced
½ cup fresh parsley, rough chopped
1 garlic clove
3 tbsp white wine vinegar
2 tbsp + 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
Juice of ½ lemon
2 tbsp apple juice
1 tsp Dijon mustard
Sea salt and fresh cracked pepper

Rinse beets and boil in a pot for approximately 30 minutes or until tender. Once tender, remove from pot, and cube the beets (peel first if desired). Set aside. In a separate pot, cook the carrots and parsnips until tender, approximately 5 minutes. While cooking place finely sliced kale into a bowl. Add 1 tbsp of olive oil, a couple of twists of sea salt and juice of ½ a lemon. Use your hands to massage kale until it becomes soft and wilted. When carrots and parsnip are done, drain and set aside. Combine the remaining 2 tbsp of olive oil, garlic, parsley, vinegar, apple juice, mustard and sea salt and pepper to taste in a blender and process into a dressing. Combine kale with the carrots and parsnip and drizzle with dressing. In their separate bowl, add dressing to beets as well. Toss ingredients in bowls to evenly coat vegetables and combine the beets with the other ingredients just prior to serving.

Chickpea and Quinoa Salad

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By Irene Hayton

I usually double or triple this recipe because it will keep in the fridge for a few days and it’s great to have on hand for a meal or snack any time of the year. Feel free to add other vegetables that you like, such as chopped red, yellow or orange sweet bell peppers, celery, snap peas, etc.

  • ½ cup (125 ml) quinoa
  • ¾ cup (175 ml) filtered water
  • ⅛ teaspoon (.5 ml) unprocessed sea salt
  • 1½ cups (375 ml) cooked chickpeas or a 398 ml (14 oz) can
  • 1 large roma tomato, diced or 12 to 16 grape tomatoes, halved
  • ¼ cup (50 ml) grated carrot
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) minced green onion

Dressing:

  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2½ teaspoons (12 ml) apple cider vinegar
  • 2½ teaspoons (12 ml) fresh lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced or pressed
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) unprocessed sea salt
  • 2 or 3 pinches cayenne pepper

Wash the quinoa by putting it in a large fine-meshed sieve and setting the sieve over a large bowl full of filtered water. Rub it gently between your hands and then rinse under cold running water; repeat this process until the water runs clear and then drain the quinoa well.

Put the quinoa, water, and sea salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover and cook for about 15 minutes or until all the water is absorbed. Remove from the heat and leave to sit with the lid on for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and cool before using in the salad.

If using canned chickpeas, rinse and drain them well. In a large bowl, stir together the quinoa, chickpeas, tomato, carrot, and green onion. Mix all the dressing ingredients, add to the salad and stir well. This tastes better if left to sit in the fridge for about an hour before eating. Makes 3 or 4 servings.

Spinach Salad with Avocado Dressing

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By Irene Hayton

Avocado Dressing:

  • half an avocado, peeled
  • ⅓ cup (75 ml) plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) light sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lemon juice
  • ¼  teaspoon (1 ml) unprocessed sea salt
  • fresh spinach
  • chopped tomato
  • chopped hard-boiled egg whites
  • grated daikon radish
  • minced red onion
  • unprocessed sea salt

To make the Avocado Dressing, place the avocado in a bowl and mash well with a fork or a potato masher until very smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and mix well. Cover and refrigerate while preparing the salad.

The amounts for the spinach, tomato, egg, radish and red onion will depend upon personal taste and the number of servings you wish to make. Drizzle each salad with Avocado Dressing and be sure to sprinkle with sea salt.

Quinoa Tabbouleh

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By Irene Hayton

Tabbouleh (also spelled tabouli) is a light, nutritious salad that keeps for a few days in the refrigerator; in fact, the longer it sits, the more flavorful it is. Instead of the traditional bulgur, this recipe uses quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wa) which is a healthier choice—it’s higher in protein and lighter in taste than most grains, and it’s generally suitable for those who have wheat and/or gluten sensitivities.

Quinoa seeds are covered with a protective coating of saponin, a bitter-tasting, soapy substance that acts as a natural pesticide. The seeds must be washed thoroughly before cooking to remove the saponin. For more information about quinoa, see the Health Tip for December 2002.

  • 1 cup (250 ml) quinoa
  • 2 cups (500 ml) filtered water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) minced lemon zest (see Notes)
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • ½ teaspoon (5 ml) unprocessed sea salt
  • 2 tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • half an English cucumber, diced
  • ½ cup (125 ml) grated carrot
  • 1 cup (250 ml) lightly packed minced fresh parsley (see Notes)
  • ¼ cup (75 ml) minced green onion
  • ½ cup (125 ml) crumbled feta cheese (optional)

To wash the quinoa, put it in a large bowl full of cold, filtered water. Rub it gently between your hands and then drain it well in a fine sieve. Repeat this process once or twice until the water no longer appears soapy, making sure the quinoa is well-drained once you finish washing it.

Put the water and a pinch of unprocessed sea salt in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil and add the quinoa. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook for about 15 minutes or until all the water is absorbed. When the quinoa is done, the grain becomes transparent and the germ unfolds and resembles a spiral. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

Combine the lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, and sea salt in a small bowl or cup; set aside.

Meanwhile, prepare the remaining ingredients and mix them together in a large glass bowl. Once the quinoa has cooled to room temperature, fluff it with a fork and add it to the bowl and mix well. Add the oil and lemon mixture, stir thoroughly and refrigerate for at least an hour to allow the flavors to blend. Makes 8 to 10 servings. (This salad is more flavorful when served at room temperature.)

Notes:

  • Use flat leaf Italian parsley instead of regular parsley for more flavor, if you can find it.
  • Use a citrus zester to remove the peel from the lemons before you squeeze them to extract the juice. If you don’t have a citrus zester, use a grater, and then mince the lemon peel.

Variations: This salad lends itself to numerous variations. Some to try are:

  • Add more feta cheese, if using.
  • Add ¼ to ½ cup (75 to 125 ml) minced fresh mint.
  • Substitute millet for the quinoa.
  • Use halved grape or cherry tomatoes instead of regular tomatoes.
  • Use fresh lime juice in place of some or all of the lemon juice.
  • Substitute fresh cilantro for some or all of the parsley.
  • Use minced red onion instead of some or all of the green onion.
  • Add diced red or yellow sweet peppers, toasted pine nuts, chopped black olives, and/or chickpeas.
  • For more flavor, add ground cumin, cayenne pepper, and/or more garlic.

 

 

Bean Salad

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By Irene Hayton

This recipe is from Eating Alive II.

  • 1½ cups (375 ml) fresh green beans, cut into 1 inch (2.5 cm) pieces
  • 1½ cups (375 ml) fresh wax beans, cut into 1 inch (2.5 cm) pieces
  • 2 cups (500 ml) cooked red kidney beans, or a 19 ounce (540 ml) can, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups (500 ml) cooked chickpeas, or 19 ounce (540 ml) can, rinsed and drained
  • ¾ cup (175 ml) diced red onion
  • 1 small sweet green pepper, diced
  • 1 celery stalk, diced

Dressing

  • ¼ cup (50 ml) apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup (50 ml) fresh lemon juice
  • ⅓ cup (75 ml) Udo’s Choice Ultimate Oil Blend®, sunflower, or safflower oil
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) oregano
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) basil
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) celery seed
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) sea salt

Blanch the green beans and the wax beans in boiling water for 4 minutes. Rinse thoroughly in cold water to stop the cooking process. Drain well and place in a large bowl; add the kidney beans, chickpeas, red onion, green pepper, and celery.

For the dressing, combine all the dressing ingredients and pour over the bean mixture; mix well. Cover and refrigerate for several hours or overnight, stirring occasionally. Makes about 10 servings.

Watercress Salad

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By carol song

This recipe is from Eating Alive II.

  • 1 English cucumber
  • 4 teaspoons (20 ml) sea salt
  • 2 cups (500 ml) water
  • 2 pinches sea salt
  • 1 bunch watercress, washed
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) sesame oil
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) minced garlic
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) stevia/Chicolin™
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar

Cut the cucumber in half lengthwise, then slice. Place the slices in a small bowl, one layer at a time, and sprinkle evenly with the 4 teaspoons of sea salt. Let sit for 10 minutes.

Bring the water to a boil, then add the 2 pinches of sea salt and the watercress. Blanch the watercress for 3 minutes, drain it thoroughly, then coarsely chop it.

Rinse the cucumber and drain well.

In a large bowl, combine the watercress, cucumber, soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, stevia/Chicolin™, and apple cider vinegar; mix well. Serves 2 to 3 people as a side dish. Goes well with rice dishes and/or chicken.

Optional additions: pinch of roasted sesame seeds or ½ teaspoon (2 ml) of sesame paste.

Sauerkraut Salad

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By irene hayton

Even though we recommend that you limit the amount of salads that you eat during cooler weather, it’s okay to include this one in your diet because the cabbage is fermented, so it’s easier to digest and not too cooling. This recipe is from Eating Alive II.

  • 2 cups (500 ml) chopped sauerkraut
  • ¼ cup (50 ml) grated carrot
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) finely chopped sweet red pepper
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons (30 to 45 ml) grated or finely chopped red or white onion, to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon (1 ml) paprika
  • sliced green onions (optional)

Place the sauerkraut in a sieve and rinse with cold water to remove some of the salt; this step is optional as you may wish to use the sauerkraut as is. Drain off some of the liquid and place the sauerkraut in a large glass bowl. Add the remaining ingredients and mix well. Makes 4 servings.

Basmati Rice and Quinoa Salad

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By Carol Song

  • 2 cups (500 ml) brown basmati rice
  • ½ cup (125 ml) quinoa
  • 3 cups (750 ml) filtered water
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) cumin seeds
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) sesame seeds
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) hemp seeds
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) Udo’s Choice Ultimate Oil Blend®
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) lemon juice

Optional:

  • ¼ cup (50 ml) chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 cup (250 ml) firm tofu or cooked tempeh, chopped into ½ inch/1 cm cubes

Rinse the rice and quinoa in a sieve, drain and then place in a large pot with the water, ½ teaspoon (2 ml) of the sea salt, and cumin seeds. Bring to a boil, stir and then reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 30 to 35 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Put the cooked brown basmati rice and quinoa into a large mixing bowl and add the remaining ½ tsp of sea salt, sesame and hemp seeds, Udo’s oil, sesame oil, lemon juice, and any optional ingredients. Mix well. Serve with chicken or fish as a side dish or wrapped in a sheet of nori (See Note). Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Note: Nori is a type of seaweed or sea vegetable. It is most commonly available as paper-thin sheets and is used in Japanese restaurants for making sushi. It is deep purple in color and turns green when toasted. Nori is high in protein content and vitamin A. It can be eaten as a snack right from the package, dry-roasted and then crumbled and added to soups, salads, or grain dishes, or filled with grains, vegetables, and/or protein foods and rolled up like a wrap.

 

Asian Salmon and Rice Salad

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By Irene Hayton

Dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) Udo’s Choice Ultimate Oil Blend®
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) tamari soy sauce
  • 1½ tablespoons (22 ml) rice vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) grated fresh ginger
  • small clove garlic, pressed or finely minced
  • 6 ounces (170 g) cooked wild salmon, about 1 cup/250 ml (see Notes)
  • 1 cup (250 ml) cooked brown basmati rice
  • 12 snow peas, trimmed and cut into 3 pieces each
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) minced fresh cilantro
  • 2 teaspoons (10) minced green onion

Combine all the dressing ingredients, mix well and put in the refrigerator until needed.

Break the salmon into small chunks and combine with remaining ingredients in a bowl. Mix gently. Divide the mixture into 2 salad bowls and pour 1 to 2 tablespoons (15 to 30 ml) of the dressing over each (to taste); mix well and season with sea salt if desired. Makes 2 servings.

Notes:

  • You can substitute a 7½ ounce (213 g) can of wild salmon (drained) for the cooked salmon.
  • Sprinkle the salad with toasted sesame seeds, to taste.
  • Place a small amount of salad onto a leaf of romaine lettuce, roll up, and enjoy.

 

Chickpea and Grape Tomato Salad

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By Irene Hayton and Carol Song

  • 2 cups (500 ml) cooked chickpeas, or 19 ounce (540 ml) can, rinsed and drained
  • 20 grape tomatoes or cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ½ cup (125 ml) crumbled feta cheese
  • ½ cup (125 ml) diced sweet orange or yellow pepper
  • ½ cup (125 ml) chopped cucumber

Dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) Udo’s Choice Ultimate Oil Blend®
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) Dijon mustard
  • ¼ teaspoon (1 ml) or more sea salt
  • 2 pinches stevia powder

In a large bowl, combine the chickpeas, grape tomatoes, feta, peppers, and cucumber. Mix together all dressing ingredients and pour over salad. If possible, allow to sit, refrigerated, for at least an hour before serving.

Greek Salad

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By Irene Hayton

This recipe is from Eating Alive II. 

Dressing:

  • ¼ cup (50 ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) apple cider vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) oregano
  • ¼ teaspoon (1 ml) sea salt
  • 2 large or 3 medium tomatoes
  • 1 cucumber (peeled, unless using long English cucumber)
  •  2 small sweet green and/or red peppers
  •  half a red onion
  •  ½ cup (125 ml) crumbled feta cheese
  •  Calamata olives (optional)

Combine all the dressing ingredients and mix well. Cover and let stand at room temperature for at least 1 hour before serving the salad, to allow the flavours to blend.

Cut the tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, and red onion into bite-size pieces. Toss gently with the feta and olives in a large glass bowl. Allow each person to add the dressing to his/her salad; you don’t need to use a lot of dressing because the chopped vegetables create a lot of juice. Any leftover dressing can be kept for a few days. Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Variation: Omit the peppers and red onion. Add torn Romaine lettuce, chopped fresh cilantro, and chopped green onions.

Jap Chae

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By Carol Song

Jap Chae is a Korean warm noodle salad. This version contains chicken and can be served as a main course, or you can omit the chicken and serve as a side dish. Dang myun noodles are made from sweet potatoes; they can be found in Asian markets but if they’re not available, you can substitute cellophane (bean thread) noodles. Don’t be intimidated by the long list of ingredients in this recipe; it’s easy to make, it just takes a while. The finished product is well worth the effort.

Marinade:

  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) soy sauce
  • ¼ teaspoon (1 ml) baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon (1 ml) stevia/ChicolinTM (see Eating Alive II)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil
  • 1 pound (500g) boneless, skinless chicken beast, thinly slicedSauce:
  • ½ cup (125 ml) soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) water
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) stevia/ChicolinTM
  • 12 ounce (350 g) package dang myun noodles
  • 2 bunches fresh spinach (washed, blanched, well-drained, and chopped)
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced (divided)
  • several pinches sea salt
  • ½ cup (125 ml) sesame oil (2 tablespoons/30 ml for spinach)
  • 3 teaspoons (15 ml) coconut oil (divided)
  • 3 large carrots, coarsely grated
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons (45 to 60 ml) water (divided)
  • 1 red pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow pepper, thinly sliced
  • 15 shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced (use fresh or dried—soak dried mushrooms in hot water for half an hour)
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) soy sauce (for mushrooms)
  • 1 pinch stevia/ChicolinTM (for mushrooms)
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) roasted sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, pine nuts, and/or hemp seeds

For the marinade, stir together the soy sauce, baking soda, stevia/ChicolinTM, garlic, and olive oil in a small mixing bowl. Add the chicken and mix well to coat; put in the refrigerator to marinate.

For the sauce, place the soy sauce, water, and stevia/ChicolinTM in a pot and heat until hot (but not boiling). Set aside to cool.

Bring 6 cups (1.5 L) of filtered water to a boil and add the dang myun noodles. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the noodles are tender but not mushy. Drain and immediately rinse thoroughly in cold water; set aside to drain again. (If using cellophane noodles, cook according to package directions.)

Place the spinach in a large mixing bowl. Add 1 clove of the minced garlic, 2 pinches of the sea salt, and 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of sesame oil; mix thoroughly and set aside.

Heat a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of the coconut oil and 2 cloves of the minced garlic and stir. Immediately add the carrots and stir-fry for about 3 minutes, adding 1 to 2 tablespoons (15 to 30 ml) of the water to prevent sticking. Add the red and yellow peppers and continue stir-frying for 2 more minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Add 4 pinches of the sea salt, mix well, and place on top of the spinach.

Return the skillet or wok to the heat. Add 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of the coconut oil and 1 clove of the minced garlic and stir. Immediately add the shitake mushrooms and stir-fry for about 5 minutes, adding 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of the water to prevent sticking. Add 2 pinches of the sea salt, 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of soy sauce, and a pinch of stevia/ChicolinTM; mix well and place on top of the carrots and peppers.

Return the skillet or wok to the heat again. Add 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of the coconut oil and 1 clove of the minced garlic and stir. Immediately add the marinated chicken and stir-fry until cooked, about 5 minutes, adding 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of the water to prevent sticking. Place on top of the shitake mushrooms.

Cut the drained noodles with scissors into 3-inch pieces (the noodles are quite slippery to cut with a knife—kitchen scissors work best). Add the noodles to the vegetables and chicken then stir in the sauce and the rest of the sesame oil; mix thoroughly. Sprinkle with roasted seeds or pine nuts before serving. Makes 4 servings.

Taco Salad

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By Irene Hayton

If you do not have an ileocecal valve problem, this is a salad that you can eat even in cooler temperatures because the lettuce is combined with “warming foods” such as cooked ground turkey or chicken.

  • 2 teaspoons (10 ml) coconut oil
  • ¼ cup (50 ml) chopped onion
  • 1 pound (500 g) lean ground turkey or chicken breast
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • ¼ cup (50 ml) water
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon (2 ml) chili powder
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) tomato paste
  • 6 cups (1.5 L) torn Romaine lettuce leaves
  • 2 medium or 3 Roma tomatoes, chopped
  • 4 green onions, sliced
  • chopped fresh cilantro, to taste
  • ¼ to ½ cup (50 to 125 ml) grated reduced-fat Cheddar cheese or soy cheese
  • sea salt, to taste
  • 1 avocado, peeled and diced

Dressing:

  • low-fat plain yogurt
  • mild salsa

Heat a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add the coconut oil and onion and sauté for 2 minutes. Add the ground turkey and garlic and cook until the turkey is no longer pink. Drain off any fat and return the pan to low heat. Add the water, cumin, chili powder, and tomato paste; mix well and simmer for about 10 minutes, adding more water as needed to prevent the mixture from sticking to the pan. Taste and adjust seasoning, if desired. Remove from the heat and leave it to cool off while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

Place the lettuce, tomatoes, green onion, cilantro, cheese, and sea salt in a large salad bowl. Add the cooled ground turkey mixture and mix well. Add the avocado and toss gently. To make the salad dressing, mix together low-fat plain yogurt and mild salsa, to taste (try 2 parts yogurt to 1 part salsa and adjust to your preference). Allow each person to add the dressing to his/her own salad. Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Optional: Add sliced black olives and/or tortilla chips (break into small pieces). Choose tortilla chips that are made without hydrogenated vegetable oil.